A cartoon male hacker reaches through a monitor to steal a folder

by Kevin Lancaster

Bad actors were bad news for Marriott this week, as they once again reported a huge data breach. Over 5.2 million guest records were snatched by cybercriminals in January 2020. Their vehicle for entry? Employee login credentials. 

Just two staffers at one franchise property had their credentials compromised, and that was enough for cybercriminals to get front door access to Marriott’s customer data. This is just the latest example of how crucial it is for companies to make password and login credential security a priority at every level in every location.  

Cracked, stolen, and leaked credentials are the number one way that cybercriminals gain access to company systems, enabling them to deploy ransomware and steal sensitive client and business data. Compromised logins and passwords are responsible for 65% of all data breaches. Don’t become part of that statistic in 2020 by using these tips to secure every password and login right away.   

Choose Good Passwords.  Bad passwords make it easy for the bad guys to break in. Stolen password lists and software for generating possible passwords is all over the Dark Web. Not to mention, password iteration and reuse is endemic. Train staffers in choosing good passwords that are hard for cybercriminals to guess or generate.    

Use Two-Factor Authentication. The fastest way to secure passwords and logins is to start using two-factor authentication immediately. Passly is a fast, easy solution that improves password security in a snap, featuring two-factor authentication, secure remote access tools, and safe password storage capability – at a fraction of the cost of other solutions.  

Watch the Dark Web. Every day, millions of cracked or stolen user credentials and passwords are peddled on the Dark Web, along with reams of sensitive personal and corporate data. DarkWeb ID is the top solution in the channel, monitoring the Dark Web to find out if an organization’s passwords and login credentials are being shopped around, as well as alerting companies if their sensitive corporate or staff data hits the Dark Web. 

Bad passwords make a hacker’s job easy. Are your passwords on the list?